Monday, March 12, 2018

Mistborn trilogy by Brandon Sanderson

Mistborn (Mistborn, #1)  The Well of Ascension (Mistborn, #2)  The Hero of Ages (Mistborn, #3)
After a soul crushing read of The Queen of All Crows by Rod Duncan, I was really in the mood to backtrack to some classic authors that made me a bookworm.  I needed to reassert that there are good authors out there.  There are good novels of magic and wonder and epic awesomeness.

I went back and reread the "Mistborn" trilogy by Brandon Sanderson.  I fell in love with the series immediately and they left a very lasting impression with me.  They are what all these modern authors should be aspiring to do when they create these dystopian worlds and female protagonists.

I was not disappointed in the reread.  While this time around I knew everything that was coming, I was able to absorb even more goodness from the story.  This is the absolute hallmark of a master author.  No matter how many times you read a story there is always a new angle to view and new lessons to learn.  

Vin is amazing, but she is not the story.  She is merely part of a lesson to be learned.  The world that Sanderson creates around her is cosmic and complete.  The magic system of Allomancy and Feruchemy is well thought out and dependent on the story.

A decade later and I still feel the same way about these stories.  I recommend them to every person looking to get into epic fantasy.  They are epic.  They have it all.  They are the real deal.

The Queen of All Crows by Rod Duncan

I actually ended up finishing this book at the end of last year, but I needed to step away before writing my review.  When I "closed" the book, I was antagonistic and aggressive towards it.  If it hadn't been on my Kindle, I probably would have thrown it out the window, down the mountain.  Now that I am sitting down to finally write up the review a lot of that emotion is coming back so I will be keeping this review incredibly brief.  

To say I am disappointed by this novel would be an understatement.  I truly enjoyed The Bullet Catcher's Daughter immensely.  The trilogy was strong, but the first novel was something new and exciting that pulled me in from the first chapter.  The series lagged a little in the middle, but it finished strong and I continued to have high hopes for the author.  I even bought Kindle and paperback copies of each.  

I knew The Queen of All Crows was going to be a new trilogy.  It would have the same protagonist and some supporting characters, but they would be in a whole new situation.  I just wish that situation hadn't felt like an overdrawn, exhausting propaganda pamphlet.  This work was so, so disappointing.

If you were a fan of The Bullet Catcher's Daughter, I would not recommend this book to you.  If you are looking for pirates, political intrigue at every corner and an all woman society, then please pick this up and find some entertainment where I just couldn't.  

I'll continue to check in with the author to see if Elizabeth handles her predicament better than my current predictions and for any new works that might go back to those bullet catching days.  But for now, I will certainly not be supporting this work. 

Tuesday, January 9, 2018

Happy New Year and Happy Release Day

2017 was a big year for Slavic influence--I read The Bear and the Nightingale, Uprooted, and The Fifth Doll; I also played several video games that centered around Slavic myths.  When Penguin sent me an ARC for The Girl in the Tower, I was ready to close out my year with more cheryti and snow.


The Girl in the Tower by Katherine Arden


The holidays kept my reading time somewhat limited, but The Girl in the Tower was a tale that just kept pulling at me to read chapters whenever I could squeeze them in.  

I was more impressed with this novel than I was with The Bear and the Nightingale.  I don't often enjoy the second novel in a trilogy more than the first because it often seems like the author is trying way too hard to write a second novel.  Those forceful pages were not present here.  There was a growth in writing that made the cohesion of storytelling better this time around.

While Vasilisa wandered the woods and mingled with cheryti in the first novel, she was a truly wild spirit in this novel.  The magic was more present and more real.  Perhaps it was all because we knew the characters and the myths now, the author didn't have to invest as much setup and we, the readers, got to enjoy the wild ride.  There even managed to be some tiny little twists.

I'm really glad that I got introduced to this series.  It has been an exciting set of reads and new stories.  For any bookworm, that's all we can ask.  The conclusion of the trilogy is due to be released this year as well.

The novel releases today, and I will be giving a hardback copy, direct from the publisher, of The Bear and the Nightingale to one lucky reader so they can get caught up before picking up The Girl in the Tower.  Check out my Giveaway tab for your entry.

Here's to another wonderful year of the printed word.